Freelance Freedom: Starting a Freelance Business, Succeeding at Self-Employment, and Happily Being Your Own Boss

Freelance Freedom, Edition 1.0, 2013, L.A. Mulnix, 124 pages

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Contents

Introduction

Chapter One: Going Freelance

Freelancing's Positives
Freelancing's Negatives
Elements of Success

Chapter Two: Your Business Idea

Choosing Your Market
Market Research
Refining Your Business Idea
Your Business Plan

Chapter Three: Getting Started

Before You Quit Your Job
Finding Advisers
Business Organization
Choosing a Name
Registering with the Government
Accounts and Bookkeeping
Insurance

Chapter Four: Legal Issues

Independent Contractor Status
Your Client Agreement
Reviewing Client Contracts
Intellectual Property

Chapter Five: Finding Clients

Marketing
Word of Mouth
Keeping Clients
Marketing Plan

Chapter Six: Expenses

Home Office Deductions
Personal Property
Travel and Entertainment
Saving Money

Chapter Seven: Revenues

Pricing
Estimates, Quotes, and Bids
Terms and Billing
Collection Problems

Chapter Eight: Taxes

Income Taxes
Audits

Chapter Nine: Freelance Issues

Working with Clients
Working from Home
Staying Efficient and Productive
Handling Success


 

"Edward Adams has written the book that could have saved me countless hours of frustration and confusion, had he only written it 30 years ago! At that time, I was tired of working for a boss in a 9-to-5 job with little room for advancement. I painfully groped around for an alternative and gradually transitioned from my old job to becoming a freelance technical editor.

"Mr. Adams has written a very simple book about this process. His writing style is direct, with very few wasted words. He is an easy read, but watch out: He packs a lot of tips and helpful suggestions into his chapters.

"Despite being a simple, readable book, his treatment of his subjects is surprisingly complete. See, for example, his chapter on Legal Issues: His sections on Independent Contractor Status, Your Client Agreement, Reviewing Client Contracts, and Intellectual Property cover these complex matters surprisingly well in about 13 pages.

"I've been a freelance technical editor since the 1980s, so I was ready to pounce on the many inaccuracies and oversimplifications inevitably arising from his relative lack of freelance experience. I'm still looking for one! Adams, through an amazing combination of experience, observation, and research, has covered this freelance waterfront surprisingly well.

"I highly recommend this book as a good first book for readers exploring whether to go the freelance route and as a good desk-side manual for experienced freelancers."

—Francis Speltz